Magna International

Brexit Wrecked Magna International Stock, so I Bought Some

Purchases

On June 24th,  I added 30 shares of Magna International (NYSE: MGA) to The Dividend Beginner’s portfolio. Brexit managed to completely cave the stock as the corporation had just recently announced plans to build a 225,000-square-foot aluminum casting facility in Telford, U.K., that it said would create up to 295 jobs.

I purchased the shares at a $48.63, with a trading cost of $6.95 for a total cost basis of $1,465.85. The stock has pushed lower since then but I believe it’s a fantastic opening for a long-term position in this high-quality company which has been one of the top stocks in our monthly stock lists for a few months in a row.

Portfolio Diversification

My position in MG accounts for 3.08% of my portfolio value, and increases my exposure to the Industrials sector to 11.4%, which is about where I’m satisfied with it being as opposed to a few months ago where it was a pittance. If I were to increase my Industrial exposure at this point, I’d probably add to EIF.TO for the high yield in monthly payments and incredible metrics.

I still have no positions in Basic Materials, Consumer Staples, Healthcare, or Technology. This needs to be remedied soon as I’ve missed a humongous run up in precious metals (basic materials) for the year, after dropping Goldcorp Inc. after their latest dividend cut – I was fed up with their lack of shareholder appreciation.

My exposure to the Financial sector has finally fallen below 30%, as I continue to try my best to find stocks outside of this sector (it is one of the largest proponents of the TSX).

Investment Diversification

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Stock Market Review

Weekly Stock Market Review

Review

Welcome to the Dividend Beginner’s Weekly Stock Market Review, where you readers can see all of my new blog posts at a glance and decide which ones peak your interest for further reading.

I also took the time to mark down all the interesting articles related to finance, investing and economics for my readers. So go make yourself a nice warm cup of coffee and get to reading, learning, and making money!

Dividend Beginner’s Posts

Dividend Beginner’s Stats

  • Capital Gains: – $235 (-0.55%)
  • Dividend Income: + $67.88
  • Total Return: – $167.12

– $167.12 stock market return

This past week the Dividend Beginner portfolio dropped by $167.12 in capital gains, which amounts to a -0.55% weekly return. The portfolio also generated $67.88 in dividend income through AD, ENF, EIF, IPL, WCP, AAR.UN, PLZ.UN, D.UN, DRG.UN.

In total, the Dividend Beginner portfolio generated a passive $167.12 weekly loss.

For a 40-hour work week, that’s a loss of $4.18 per hour.

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Telus or Bell

Telecom Stocks: Telus vs Bell

Stock Analysis

Telus is the second largest holding in the Dividend Beginner portfolio. Bell is a new interest of mine.

Telus is one of the few stocks I’ve come across in the Canadian markets that fits all Five of the Dividend Beginner’s stock picking criteria.

I’ve purchased shares in Telus three times over the past year, and it currently accounts for 9.5% of my total portfolio value. That’s also my entire exposure to the telecommunications sector, which is one of my favourite sectors. After all, cell phones and mobile plans are basically requirements in today’s society – every one and every new person will need at least one cell phone going forward.

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Canadian Stock Watch List 2016

Stock Watch List for June 2016

Watch List

As we watch the market rise and fall, sometimes we see a big drop – the perfect opportunity to push some capital into the market and make some dividend growing investments. However, when this happens, many will watch and become lost in the vast amount of opportunities and potential investments. Which one is the best fit? Which one has the greatest expected dividend growth? These exact queries are the reason it’s so incredibly useful to make or follow a stock watch list every month, so when opportunities present themselves in abundance you know where to put your money.

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Stock Market Review

Weekly Stock Market Review

Review

Welcome to the Dividend Beginner’s Weekly Stock Market Review, where you readers can see all of my new blog posts at a glance and decide which ones peak your interest for further reading.

I also took the time to mark down all the interesting articles related to finance, investing and economics for my readers. So go make yourself a nice warm cup of coffee and get to reading, learning, and making money!

Dividend Beginner’s Posts

Dividend Beginner’s Stats

  • Capital Gains: – $336.15 (-0.78%)
  • Dividend Income: + $16.02
  • Total Return: – $320.13

– $320.13 stock market return

This past week the Dividend Beginner portfolio dropped by $336.15 in capital gains, which amounts to a -0.78% weekly return. The portfolio also generated $16.02 in dividend income through ZWU and WMT.

In total, the Dividend Beginner portfolio generated a passive $320.13 weekly loss.

For a 40-hour work week, that’s a loss of $8 per hour.

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National Bank of Canada Logo

National Bank of Canada Raises Dividend 2% While Profits Fall 48%

Dividend Raises

On June 1st, National Bank of Canada (NA) raised their quarterly dividend 1.85% from $0.54 to $0.55. The dividend yield is now 4.91%, while I picked up my shares with a giant yield of 6.14% a couple of months ago. I’ve also made a 30% capital return on my investment. I’m now kicking myself for playing it so safe with a small up-front investment. It’s been one of my Top 3 performers. Not bad for the sixth largest Canadian bank.

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dividend income may 2016 report

May 2016 Dividend Income

Dividends

This month’s dividend income saw north of $100 for the third time in my investing career. I also have forecasted over $200 in dividend income for the month of July. I want to say it’s compounding, but it’s really the aggressive investing style I’ve been able to keep together. Compounding will come very soon though, as the income piles up. The Dividend Beginner saw two new investments in extremely high yielding, monthly dividend paying, small- and mid-cap companies. Both companies were analysed throughout the month, with Exchange Income Corp. yielding close to 7%, and Corus Entertainment yielding above 9%.

Summary of May Investment Activities

Throughout April, I’ve purchased:

One of my holdings increased their dividends:

None of my holdings reduced their dividends. Great news!

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Stock Market Review

Weekly Stock Market Review

Review

Welcome to the Dividend Beginner’s Weekly Stock Market Review, where you readers can see all of my new blog posts at a glance and decide which ones peak your interest for further reading.

I also took the time to mark down all the interesting articles related to finance, investing and economics for my readers. So go make yourself a nice warm cup of coffee and get to reading, learning, and making money!

Dividend Beginner’s Posts

Dividend Beginner’s Stats

  • Capital Gains: + $317.75 (0.75%)
  • Dividend Income: + $43.55
  • Total Return: + $361.30

 $361.30 stock market return

This past week the Dividend Beginner portfolio generated $317.75 in capital gains, which amounts to a 0.75% weekly return. The portfolio also generated $43.55 in dividend income through HR.UN, RNW, GWW, FTS and SNC.

In total, the Dividend Beginner portfolio generated a passive $361.30 weekly return.

For a 40-hour work week, that’s a salary of $9.03 per hour.
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Corus Entertainment

I Bought Shares in my Childhood with Corus Entertainment

Purchases

Corus Entertainment and it’s 9%+ monthly dividend is definitely an eyesight for investors seeking an easy cash return through dividends. What’s more, Corus Entertainment is responsible for a wide variety of television channels – which much of my audience has been watching since they were kids.

YTV, particularly, was a TV channel I’d watch every day when I got home from elementary school.

It would bring me amazing shows like Pokemon, Fairly Odd Parents, Freaky Stories, Dexter’s Laboratory, Rupert, Goosebumps, Hey Arnold!, Yvon of the Yukon, Yu-Gi-Oh…

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Did you ever think you’d see Pokemon on The Dividend Beginner?

I caught wind of Corus Entertainment quite a few times while browsing the Canadian Dividend All-Star List, but never gave it much thought. Given the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)’s ruling of forcing the television providers to offer a “$25 skinny basic cable” packages, the stock took a beating throughout the past year, dropping by around 30%.

Given the drop in share price of CJR.B, the dividend yield rose to above 9%. Corus Entertainment doesn’t even have a terribly large payout ratio, yet the dividend is very high.

After analyzing the safety of the dividend and deciding I was willing to take the risk, I decided to invest in a company that made a great impact on my childhood. I don’t feel as though children these days may have the same connection to the characters on screen as my generation did in the 90s, but I could be wrong. If you disagree, please let me know in the comments as I’m truly interested.

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Retire 5 years earlier

Retire 5 Years Earlier by Getting Rid of Your Car

BeginnerLessonRetirementStrategy

Last week I had to have my winter tires changed back to summer tires, and an oil change. At the same time, since I know it’s cheaper to maintain an automobile than to replace it, I asked to have the car inspected to uncover any pressing issues.

Of course, at the end of the day I forked over my credit card to pay a $1,200 bill.

To me, that’s an entire investment in a stock. With a 5% dividend, you’d earn $60 a year with that money, or $5 a month.

I’m sure there’s something you spend $5 a month on; well, that cost could have disappeared from your life.

This obviously got me thinking, “Can I really retire earlier by getting rid of my car? How much earlier can I retire?”

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Disclaimer

My publishings on dividendbeginner.com references an opinion and is for information or entertainment purposes only. It is not intended to be investment advice. Seek a duly licensed professional for investment advice. I am not responsible for any decisions you make concerning finances, taxes, or investments. You must perform your own research and always take caution when extending capital.